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ECON 4111 Money and Banking Systems

About the Course

I have been teaching Money and Banking in the classroom since the early 1990s and have designed a web course that reflects my experience teaching this class. Money and Banking is oriented towards understanding financial markets and the evolution of the monetary and banking systems into our increasingly complex technological world. Rather than trying to race through a textbook from front to back, this web course will cover the same amount of material that I would cover if we were in a traditional classroom setting.

Objectives/Outline

Some of the topics covered in this class include:

  • Understanding stock and bond markets and asset pricing. You will simulate a portfolio to prove it.
  • Derivatives and their variations. You will gain knowledge about futures, options and other derivatives along with some hair-raising true stories about their abuses.
  • The role of technology in redefining how money is used and its potential impacts on financial markets.
  • The linkage of business cycles to financial markets and the role of monetary policy.

As well as providing a quality learning experience, I hope that you gain a good deal of practical information from this class that you can use later in life to help better manage your financial assets.

Grade Breakdown

  • 10 Written Assignments; multiple choice and short answer

Required Text

Money, the Financial System, and the Economy, by Hubbard (Addison Wesley).

Instructor Contact

Jay Kaplan, PhD

Phone: 303-413-9359

Email: jules.kaplan@colorado.edu

My name is Jay Kaplan and I am the developer of this web course in economics. I was born in Japan and grew up in Washington, DC, spending part of my youth living abroad in the Philippines, England and Germany. After graduating from the University of Maryland I worked in Washington DC, including employment with the Federal Reserve, before studying for my PhD. I now teach economics at the University of Colorado Boulder.

I first taught Principles of Macroeconomics in 1989 and many times since. Development of this web course was started in the Fall of 1994 after my first visit to the World-Wide Web. My goal for this course is not to replicate a textbook, but to create a course similar to what I would teach during a semester. In general, I find that textbooks cover significantly more material than can ever be approached during a normal semester class. Rather than an encyclopedia of information, this web course focuses on the application of macroeconomics, providing the necessary background and theoretical foundations along the way.

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